Why are local code enforcement agency inspections required?

Too many times I walk through an open house out of boredom, and many of these are flips that are either unpremitted improvements, or the building inspector is incompetent. A lot of times, I see things that raise red flags for me.

I’m sure some of this is caught in the home inspection report… but plenty of it will be buried in the walls that would only rear its ugly head in a disaster scenario. Things like a compromised shear wall, poor installation, cut corners, etc… It is literally why we have building codes and inspections during construction to verify things are built based on an engineered set of drawings and inspected before finishes hide the infrastructure.

Enter flippers. They want to be in, out, and closed in the shortest amount of time. City/county building departments take time to get things designed and approved, which hurts their bottom line. Hence, a lot of them don’t pull permits for things that should be permitted.

One funny walkthrough a few blocks from my house, I saw when the original owner sold it to a flipper at that open house. About 3 months later, I saw the flip renovation.

The listing agent showed me the new “laundry room.” I literally had to ask where the water, sewer, and gas connections were. (Hint, they weren’t there but the brochure listed it as a laundry room). Same deal with the kitchen. No gas or 220 for the stove, and they didn’t put a dishwasher in the renovated casework.

Yeah, that would get caught in a home inspection, but that screams to me that these guys cut every corner they could. So how many other corners did they cut? I checked with the city’s plan check portal, of course no permits pulled despite the fact that they altered the under-slab plumbing. Hopefully the new owners don’t have shit sitting in a low spot under their sink they have to snake every month.

A scary one – someone enclosed their back patio to add another bedroom and bathroom (quasi MIL quarters). The plan of the building had a hallway with two bedrooms at the end of the hall. There was a gas fired wall heater in the hallway. The bedroom by the patio had the MIL unit build a wall right in front of it’s only window with literally 3” of clearance between the building wall and the MIL quarters.

Basically if there was a fire in the hall, the probably 8 year old girl who’s room that was is probably not going to make it.

I just don’t understand how lenders don’t require a permit check and require the local AHJ coming out for a code violation inspection every time a building changes hands.

submitted by /u/Wrxeter
[link] [comments]

Too many times I walk through an open house out of boredom, and many of these are flips that are either unpremitted improvements, or the building inspector is incompetent. A lot of times, I see things that raise red flags for me. I’m sure some of this is caught in the home inspection report… but plenty of it will be buried in the walls that would only rear its ugly head in a disaster scenario. Things like a compromised shear wall, poor installation, cut corners, etc… It is literally why we have building codes and inspections during construction to verify things are built based on an engineered set of drawings and inspected before finishes hide the infrastructure. Enter flippers. They want to be in, out, and closed in the shortest amount of time. City/county building departments take time to get things designed and approved, which hurts their bottom line. Hence, a lot of them don’t pull permits for things that should be permitted. One funny walkthrough a few blocks from my house, I saw when the original owner sold it to a flipper at that open house. About 3 months later, I saw the flip renovation. The listing agent showed me the new “laundry room.” I literally had to ask where the water, sewer, and gas connections were. (Hint, they weren’t there but the brochure listed it as a laundry room). Same deal with the kitchen. No gas or 220 for the stove, and they didn’t put a dishwasher in the renovated casework. Yeah, that would get caught in a home inspection, but that screams to me that these guys cut every corner they could. So how many other corners did they cut? I checked with the city’s plan check portal, of course no permits pulled despite the fact that they altered the under-slab plumbing. Hopefully the new owners don’t have shit sitting in a low spot under their sink they have to snake every month. A scary one – someone enclosed their back patio to add another bedroom and bathroom (quasi MIL quarters). The plan of the building had a hallway with two bedrooms at the end of the hall. There was a gas fired wall heater in the hallway. The bedroom by the patio had the MIL unit build a wall right in front of it’s only window with literally 3” of clearance between the building wall and the MIL quarters. Basically if there was a fire in the hall, the probably 8 year old girl who’s room that was is probably not going to make it. I just don’t understand how lenders don’t require a permit check and require the local AHJ coming out for a code violation inspection every time a building changes hands. submitted by /u/Wrxeter [link] [comments]

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