BOUGHT A PROPERTY THAT IS TENANT OCCUPIED, SELLER DIDN’T GIVE TENANTS A 30 DAY NOTICE TO MOVE OUT BEFORE CLOSING OF THE SALE???

A month ago I went under contract on a house that also has a duplex in the back. There was/is a tenant living in the duplex and a tenant living in the main house who were aware the owner was selling the property. Today I went for a final walk through of the property as we are closing in 2 days, only to find out the seller didn’t give tenants a 30 days notice to move out so both units are occupied & I planned to move into the main house upon closing. The real estate agent for the seller is saying I should’ve disclosed I wanted the tenants gone before closing/put it in writing and that now I have to give the tenants myself a 30 days notice on the day we close. Keep in mind no one ever bothered to send me or even mention the rental leases/agreements that the seller has in place with the current tenants. All i know is they are month to month leases. I guess my question is should the seller have given me more information/included in my contract the lease agreements she has with the current tenants?/Disclosed more information? It seems like the seller wanted to keep making income off the tenants until the last possible moment which I get, but shouldn’t her real estate agent have given me more information or took it upon himself to include some sort of addendum about the current tenants and their leases? Keep in mind I’m supposed to close on this house in two days and no one has mentioned any exact information about the current tenants and their leases. I guess my question is the seller/her real estate agent at fault for anything here? Should she have given the tenants a 30 days notice when our contract was signed? Or am I fucked and have to wait another month to move into my new house. I’m familiar with tenant rights under this circumstance so I know their leases still stand even with a new owner. But shouldn’t I have been made aware of this?

submitted by /u/1acey666
[link] [comments]

A month ago I went under contract on a house that also has a duplex in the back. There was/is a tenant living in the duplex and a tenant living in the main house who were aware the owner was selling the property. Today I went for a final walk through of the property as we are closing in 2 days, only to find out the seller didn’t give tenants a 30 days notice to move out so both units are occupied & I planned to move into the main house upon closing. The real estate agent for the seller is saying I should’ve disclosed I wanted the tenants gone before closing/put it in writing and that now I have to give the tenants myself a 30 days notice on the day we close. Keep in mind no one ever bothered to send me or even mention the rental leases/agreements that the seller has in place with the current tenants. All i know is they are month to month leases. I guess my question is should the seller have given me more information/included in my contract the lease agreements she has with the current tenants?/Disclosed more information? It seems like the seller wanted to keep making income off the tenants until the last possible moment which I get, but shouldn’t her real estate agent have given me more information or took it upon himself to include some sort of addendum about the current tenants and their leases? Keep in mind I’m supposed to close on this house in two days and no one has mentioned any exact information about the current tenants and their leases. I guess my question is the seller/her real estate agent at fault for anything here? Should she have given the tenants a 30 days notice when our contract was signed? Or am I fucked and have to wait another month to move into my new house. I’m familiar with tenant rights under this circumstance so I know their leases still stand even with a new owner. But shouldn’t I have been made aware of this? submitted by /u/1acey666 [link] [comments]

<a href="Read More“>View Full Article

Need More Commercial Real Estate Leads?SAVE 40% this month!

Our commercial valuation calculator was created to evaluate commercial real estate. In 6 quick steps you will know your NOI, CAP RATE, and IRR.

Now you can get your own branded version of our calculator!